20% LESS ADDED SUGAR IS A SWEET DEAL FOR BAKERS DELIGHT CUSTOMERS

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Teatime fans rejoice – Bakers Delight has reduced the amount of sugar in its sweet treat doughs by 20%.  

Bakers Delight is the first Australian QSR to make the switch to low-GI Sunshine Sugar. Unlike artificial sweeteners, low-GI Sunshine Sugar is not only 100 per cent natural, but less processed and less refined. This results in a bold flavour that is sweet enough for bakers to significantly reduce the amount of sugar they add to their sweet doughs. 

“Dropping in to Bakers Delight for an after school treat is a weekly ritual for many Australian families, so we are delighted that we can now use less added sugar to deliver the same great flavours our customers love,” said Bakers Delight Joint CEO, Elise Gillespie 

Low-GI Sunshine Sugar uses the Nucane™ technology, which was developed by Dr David Kannar, Chairman & Founder of Nutrition Innovation, as an alternative to refined sugar after losing his brother to Type 2 diabetes. 

“Sunshine Sugar’s Low-GI sugar aims to make sugar part of the solution rather than the problem. The way refined sugar is processed means all-natural antioxidants in the raw sugar cane are removed, leaving behind a high-GI sugar. Whereas Nucane™ uses infrared technology during the milling process to ensure powerful minerals such as calcium, magnesium and potassium remain,” said Dr Kannar.   

“The powerful antioxidants of Sunshine Sugar’s Low-GI sugar have been scientifically shown to work in two very important ways. Firstly, they actively inhibit digestive enzymes to reduce glucose and fructose absorbed by the body, promoting the low glycaemic effect. Secondly, the natural antioxidants slow down the transportation of glucose into the blood stream, helping to reduce blood sugar from increasing.”

Low-GI Sunshine Sugar has replaced all added sugar in Bakers Delight sweet doughs across Australia and New Zealand. This includes family favourites such as, scrolls, finger buns, bunlets, sweet bread loaves, swirls, logs and teatimes.


Darcy Fray